Genetic Epidemiology, Translational Neurogenomics, Psychiatric Genetics and Statistical Genetics Laboratories investigate the pattern of disease in families, particularly identical and non-identical twins, to assess the relative importance of genes and environment in a variety of important health problems.
QIMR Home Page
GenEpi Home Page
Publications
Contacts
Research
Staff Index
Collaborators
Software Tools
Computing Resources
Studies
Search
GenEpi Intranet
PMID
31943258
TITLE
High-Intensity Drinking in Adult Australian Twins.
ABSTRACT
BACKGROUND NlmCategory: BACKGROUND
Many adult drinkers consume far beyond the binge threshold. This "high-intensity drinking" (HID), defined as 2 (HID-2) and 3 (HID-3) times the binge threshold, is of public health interest due to its role in acute alcohol-related harms. Research on HID has mostly been limited to college-aged young adults, focused on contextual factors, and neglected the potential role of genetic influences on the propensity to engage in HID.
METHODS NlmCategory: METHODS
Many adult drinkers consume far beyond the binge threshold. This "high-intensity drinking" (HID), defined as 2 (HID-2) and 3 (HID-3) times the binge threshold, is of public health interest due to its role in acute alcohol-related harms. Research on HID has mostly been limited to college-aged young adults, focused on contextual factors, and neglected the potential role of genetic influences on the propensity to engage in HID. Structured diagnostic interviews assessing past-year alcohol involvement were conducted with 3,785 individuals (1,365 men, 2,420 women; M  = 32, range = 21 to 46), including 3,314 twins and 471 nontwin siblings from the Australian Twin Registry. Multinomial logistic regression analyses were conducted to compare HID-2 and HID-3 to binge drinking on demographic correlates, drinking characteristics, and drinking-related consequences. Biometric modeling was conducted to estimate the role of genetic, common, and individual-specific environmental factors in HID propensity.
RESULTS NlmCategory: RESULTS
Many adult drinkers consume far beyond the binge threshold. This "high-intensity drinking" (HID), defined as 2 (HID-2) and 3 (HID-3) times the binge threshold, is of public health interest due to its role in acute alcohol-related harms. Research on HID has mostly been limited to college-aged young adults, focused on contextual factors, and neglected the potential role of genetic influences on the propensity to engage in HID. Structured diagnostic interviews assessing past-year alcohol involvement were conducted with 3,785 individuals (1,365 men, 2,420 women; M  = 32, range = 21 to 46), including 3,314 twins and 471 nontwin siblings from the Australian Twin Registry. Multinomial logistic regression analyses were conducted to compare HID-2 and HID-3 to binge drinking on demographic correlates, drinking characteristics, and drinking-related consequences. Biometric modeling was conducted to estimate the role of genetic, common, and individual-specific environmental factors in HID propensity. Among past-year drinkers, the prevalence of HID-2 and HID-3 was both 22%, with men disproportionally represented. The frequencies of drinking, intoxication, and binge drinking significantly increased across the heavier drinking categories, which also evidenced higher average consumption quantities and higher rates of alcohol-related consequences. The propensity to engage in HID was significantly heritable (A = 37% [95% CI: 28 to 46%]), with individual-specific environmental influences accounting for the remainder of the variance.
CONCLUSIONS NlmCategory: CONCLUSIONS
Many adult drinkers consume far beyond the binge threshold. This "high-intensity drinking" (HID), defined as 2 (HID-2) and 3 (HID-3) times the binge threshold, is of public health interest due to its role in acute alcohol-related harms. Research on HID has mostly been limited to college-aged young adults, focused on contextual factors, and neglected the potential role of genetic influences on the propensity to engage in HID. Structured diagnostic interviews assessing past-year alcohol involvement were conducted with 3,785 individuals (1,365 men, 2,420 women; M  = 32, range = 21 to 46), including 3,314 twins and 471 nontwin siblings from the Australian Twin Registry. Multinomial logistic regression analyses were conducted to compare HID-2 and HID-3 to binge drinking on demographic correlates, drinking characteristics, and drinking-related consequences. Biometric modeling was conducted to estimate the role of genetic, common, and individual-specific environmental factors in HID propensity. Among past-year drinkers, the prevalence of HID-2 and HID-3 was both 22%, with men disproportionally represented. The frequencies of drinking, intoxication, and binge drinking significantly increased across the heavier drinking categories, which also evidenced higher average consumption quantities and higher rates of alcohol-related consequences. The propensity to engage in HID was significantly heritable (A = 37% [95% CI: 28 to 46%]), with individual-specific environmental influences accounting for the remainder of the variance. This study convincingly demonstrates that HID is not restricted to college-aged young adults, but also can be highly prevalent among those of working age, and that the propensity to engage in HID is partially explained by genetic influences.
2020 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.
DATE PUBLISHED
2020 Jan 13
HISTORY
PUBSTATUS PUBSTATUSDATE
received 2019/07/12
accepted 2019/11/29
entrez 2020/01/17 06:00
pubmed 2020/01/17 06:00
medline 2020/01/17 06:00
AUTHORS
NAME COLLECTIVENAME LASTNAME FORENAME INITIALS AFFILIATION AFFILIATIONINFO
Dash GF Dash Genevieve F GF From the, Department of Psychological Sciences, (GFD, CND, WSS), University of Missouri- Columbia, Columbia, Missouri.
Davis CN Davis Christal N CN From the, Department of Psychological Sciences, (GFD, CND, WSS), University of Missouri- Columbia, Columbia, Missouri.
Martin NG Martin Nicholas G NG Queensland Institute of Medical Research (QIMR) Berghofer, (NGM), Brisbane, QLD, Australia.
Statham DJ Statham Dixie J DJ Department of Psychology, (DJS), Federation University, Ballarat, Vic., Australia.
Lynskey MT Lynskey Michael T MT Department of Addictions, (MTL), King's College London Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, London, UK.
Slutske WS Slutske Wendy S WS From the, Department of Psychological Sciences, (GFD, CND, WSS), University of Missouri- Columbia, Columbia, Missouri.
INVESTIGATORS
JOURNAL
VOLUME:
ISSUE:
TITLE: Alcoholism, clinical and experimental research
ISOABBREVIATION: Alcohol. Clin. Exp. Res.
YEAR: 2020
MONTH: Jan
DAY: 13
MEDLINEDATE:
SEASON:
CITEDMEDIUM: Internet
ISSN: 1530-0277
ISSNTYPE: Electronic
MEDLINE JOURNAL
MEDLINETA: Alcohol Clin Exp Res
COUNTRY: England
ISSNLINKING: 0145-6008
NLMUNIQUEID: 7707242
PUBLICATION TYPE
PUBLICATIONTYPE TEXT
Journal Article
COMMENTS AND CORRECTIONS
GRANTS
GRANTID AGENCY COUNTRY
T32AA013526 NIAAA NIH HHS United States
GENERAL NOTE
KEYWORDS
KEYWORD
Alcohol
Binge Drinking
High-Intensity Drinking
Twin Study
MESH HEADINGS
SUPPLEMENTARY MESH
GENE SYMBOLS
CHEMICALS
OTHER ID's