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31665216
TITLE
Association of Copy Number Variation of the 15q11.2 BP1-BP2 Region With Cortical and Subcortical Morphology and Cognition.
ABSTRACT
Importance NlmCategory: UNASSIGNED
Recurrent microdeletions and duplications in the genomic region 15q11.2 between breakpoints 1 (BP1) and 2 (BP2) are associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. These structural variants are present in 0.5% to 1.0% of the population, making 15q11.2 BP1-BP2 the site of the most prevalent known pathogenic copy number variation (CNV). It is unknown to what extent this CNV influences brain structure and affects cognitive abilities.
Objective NlmCategory: UNASSIGNED
Recurrent microdeletions and duplications in the genomic region 15q11.2 between breakpoints 1 (BP1) and 2 (BP2) are associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. These structural variants are present in 0.5% to 1.0% of the population, making 15q11.2 BP1-BP2 the site of the most prevalent known pathogenic copy number variation (CNV). It is unknown to what extent this CNV influences brain structure and affects cognitive abilities. To determine the association of the 15q11.2 BP1-BP2 deletion and duplication CNVs with cortical and subcortical brain morphology and cognitive task performance.
Design, Setting, and Participants NlmCategory: UNASSIGNED
Recurrent microdeletions and duplications in the genomic region 15q11.2 between breakpoints 1 (BP1) and 2 (BP2) are associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. These structural variants are present in 0.5% to 1.0% of the population, making 15q11.2 BP1-BP2 the site of the most prevalent known pathogenic copy number variation (CNV). It is unknown to what extent this CNV influences brain structure and affects cognitive abilities. To determine the association of the 15q11.2 BP1-BP2 deletion and duplication CNVs with cortical and subcortical brain morphology and cognitive task performance. In this genetic association study, T1-weighted brain magnetic resonance imaging were combined with genetic data from the ENIGMA-CNV consortium and the UK Biobank, with a replication cohort from Iceland. In total, 203 deletion carriers, 45 247 noncarriers, and 306 duplication carriers were included. Data were collected from August 2015 to April 2019, and data were analyzed from September 2018 to September 2019.
Main Outcomes and Measures NlmCategory: UNASSIGNED
Recurrent microdeletions and duplications in the genomic region 15q11.2 between breakpoints 1 (BP1) and 2 (BP2) are associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. These structural variants are present in 0.5% to 1.0% of the population, making 15q11.2 BP1-BP2 the site of the most prevalent known pathogenic copy number variation (CNV). It is unknown to what extent this CNV influences brain structure and affects cognitive abilities. To determine the association of the 15q11.2 BP1-BP2 deletion and duplication CNVs with cortical and subcortical brain morphology and cognitive task performance. In this genetic association study, T1-weighted brain magnetic resonance imaging were combined with genetic data from the ENIGMA-CNV consortium and the UK Biobank, with a replication cohort from Iceland. In total, 203 deletion carriers, 45 247 noncarriers, and 306 duplication carriers were included. Data were collected from August 2015 to April 2019, and data were analyzed from September 2018 to September 2019. The associations of the CNV with global and regional measures of surface area and cortical thickness as well as subcortical volumes were investigated, correcting for age, age2, sex, scanner, and intracranial volume. Additionally, measures of cognitive ability were analyzed in the full UK Biobank cohort.
Results NlmCategory: UNASSIGNED
Recurrent microdeletions and duplications in the genomic region 15q11.2 between breakpoints 1 (BP1) and 2 (BP2) are associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. These structural variants are present in 0.5% to 1.0% of the population, making 15q11.2 BP1-BP2 the site of the most prevalent known pathogenic copy number variation (CNV). It is unknown to what extent this CNV influences brain structure and affects cognitive abilities. To determine the association of the 15q11.2 BP1-BP2 deletion and duplication CNVs with cortical and subcortical brain morphology and cognitive task performance. In this genetic association study, T1-weighted brain magnetic resonance imaging were combined with genetic data from the ENIGMA-CNV consortium and the UK Biobank, with a replication cohort from Iceland. In total, 203 deletion carriers, 45 247 noncarriers, and 306 duplication carriers were included. Data were collected from August 2015 to April 2019, and data were analyzed from September 2018 to September 2019. The associations of the CNV with global and regional measures of surface area and cortical thickness as well as subcortical volumes were investigated, correcting for age, age2, sex, scanner, and intracranial volume. Additionally, measures of cognitive ability were analyzed in the full UK Biobank cohort. Of 45 756 included individuals, the mean (SD) age was 55.8 (18.3) years, and 23 754 (51.9%) were female. Compared with noncarriers, deletion carriers had a lower surface area (Cohen d = -0.41; SE, 0.08; P = 4.9 × 10-8), thicker cortex (Cohen d = 0.36; SE, 0.07; P = 1.3 × 10-7), and a smaller nucleus accumbens (Cohen d = -0.27; SE, 0.07; P = 7.3 × 10-5). There was also a significant negative dose response on cortical thickness (β = -0.24; SE, 0.05; P = 6.8 × 10-7). Regional cortical analyses showed a localization of the effects to the frontal, cingulate, and parietal lobes. Further, cognitive ability was lower for deletion carriers compared with noncarriers on 5 of 7 tasks.
Conclusions and Relevance NlmCategory: UNASSIGNED
Recurrent microdeletions and duplications in the genomic region 15q11.2 between breakpoints 1 (BP1) and 2 (BP2) are associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. These structural variants are present in 0.5% to 1.0% of the population, making 15q11.2 BP1-BP2 the site of the most prevalent known pathogenic copy number variation (CNV). It is unknown to what extent this CNV influences brain structure and affects cognitive abilities. To determine the association of the 15q11.2 BP1-BP2 deletion and duplication CNVs with cortical and subcortical brain morphology and cognitive task performance. In this genetic association study, T1-weighted brain magnetic resonance imaging were combined with genetic data from the ENIGMA-CNV consortium and the UK Biobank, with a replication cohort from Iceland. In total, 203 deletion carriers, 45 247 noncarriers, and 306 duplication carriers were included. Data were collected from August 2015 to April 2019, and data were analyzed from September 2018 to September 2019. The associations of the CNV with global and regional measures of surface area and cortical thickness as well as subcortical volumes were investigated, correcting for age, age2, sex, scanner, and intracranial volume. Additionally, measures of cognitive ability were analyzed in the full UK Biobank cohort. Of 45 756 included individuals, the mean (SD) age was 55.8 (18.3) years, and 23 754 (51.9%) were female. Compared with noncarriers, deletion carriers had a lower surface area (Cohen d = -0.41; SE, 0.08; P = 4.9 × 10-8), thicker cortex (Cohen d = 0.36; SE, 0.07; P = 1.3 × 10-7), and a smaller nucleus accumbens (Cohen d = -0.27; SE, 0.07; P = 7.3 × 10-5). There was also a significant negative dose response on cortical thickness (β = -0.24; SE, 0.05; P = 6.8 × 10-7). Regional cortical analyses showed a localization of the effects to the frontal, cingulate, and parietal lobes. Further, cognitive ability was lower for deletion carriers compared with noncarriers on 5 of 7 tasks. These findings, from the largest CNV neuroimaging study to date, provide evidence that 15q11.2 BP1-BP2 structural variation is associated with brain morphology and cognition, with deletion carriers being particularly affected. The pattern of results fits with known molecular functions of genes in the 15q11.2 BP1-BP2 region and suggests involvement of these genes in neuronal plasticity. These neurobiological effects likely contribute to the association of this CNV with neurodevelopmental disorders.
DATE PUBLISHED
2019 Oct 30
HISTORY
PUBSTATUS PUBSTATUSDATE
pmc-release 2020/10/30
entrez 2019/10/31 06:00
pubmed 2019/10/31 06:00
medline 2019/10/31 06:00
AUTHORS
NAME COLLECTIVENAME LASTNAME FORENAME INITIALS AFFILIATION AFFILIATIONINFO
Writing Committee for the ENIGMA-CNV Working Group
van der Meer D van der Meer Dennis D School of Mental Health and Neuroscience, Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands.
Sønderby IE Sønderby Ida E IE Norwegian Centre for Mental Disorders Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
Kaufmann T Kaufmann Tobias T Norwegian Centre for Mental Disorders Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
Walters GB Walters G Bragi GB Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland.
Abdellaoui A Abdellaoui Abdel A Department of Biological Psychology and Netherlands Twin Register, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
Ames D Ames David D National Ageing Research Institute, Parkville, Australia.
Amunts K Amunts Katrin K JARA-BRAIN, Juelich-Aachen Research Alliance, Juelich, Germany.
Andersson M Andersson Micael M Department of Integrative Medical Biology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Armstrong NJ Armstrong Nicola J NJ Mathematics and Statistics, Murdoch University, Perth, Australia.
Bernard M Bernard Manon M Research Institute, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Blackburn NB Blackburn Nicholas B NB South Texas Diabetes and Obesity Institute, Department of Human Genetics, School of Medicine, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Brownsville.
Blangero J Blangero John J South Texas Diabetes and Obesity Institute, Department of Human Genetics, School of Medicine, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Brownsville.
Boomsma DI Boomsma Dorret I DI Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, VU Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
Brodaty H Brodaty Henry H Dementia Centre for Research Collaboration, School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.
Brouwer RM Brouwer Rachel M RM Department of Psychiatry, UMC Brain Center, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands.
Bülow R Bülow Robin R Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany.
Cahn W Cahn Wiepke W Altrecht Science, Utrecht, the Netherlands.
Calhoun VD Calhoun Vince D VD The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque.
Caspers S Caspers Svenja S Institute for Anatomy I, Medical Faculty, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany.
Cavalleri GL Cavalleri Gianpiero L GL The SFI FutureNeuro Research Centre, Dublin, Ireland.
Ching CRK Ching Christopher R K CRK Imaging Genetics Center, Mark and Mary Stevens Institute for Neuroimaging and Informatics, University of Southern California, Los Angeles.
Cichon S Cichon Sven S Institute of Medical Genetics and Pathology, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
Ciufolini S Ciufolini Simone S Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, United Kingdom.
Corvin A Corvin Aiden A Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychiatric Genetics Research Group, Institute of Molecular Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
Crespo-Facorro B Crespo-Facorro Benedicto B University Hospital Virgen del Rocío, IBiS, Centre de Investigación Biomédica en Red Salud Mental (CIBERSAM), Sevilla, Spain.
Curran JE Curran Joanne E JE South Texas Diabetes and Obesity Institute, Department of Human Genetics, School of Medicine, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Brownsville.
Dalvie S Dalvie Shareefa S Department of Psychiatry and Neuroscience Institute, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, Western Cape, South Africa.
Dazzan P Dazzan Paola P Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, United Kingdom.
de Geus EJC de Geus Eco J C EJC Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, VU Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
de Zubicaray GI de Zubicaray Greig I GI Faculty of Health and Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.
de Zwarte SMC de Zwarte Sonja M C SMC Department of Psychiatry, UMC Brain Center, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands.
Delanty N Delanty Norman N Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.
den Braber A den Braber Anouk A Alzheimer Center Amsterdam, Department of Neurology, Amsterdam Neuroscience, VU Amsterdam, Amsterdam UMC, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
Desrivieres S Desrivieres Sylvane S Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, United Kingdom.
Di Forti M Di Forti Marta M Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, United Kingdom.
Doherty JL Doherty Joanne L JL Cardiff University Brain Research Imaging Centre School of Psychology, Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom.
Donohoe G Donohoe Gary G Centre for Neuroimaging and Cognitive Genomics, School of Psychology and Discipline of Biochemistry, National University of Ireland Galway, Galway, Ireland.
Ehrlich S Ehrlich Stefan S Psychological and Social Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden, Germany.
Eising E Eising Else E Language and Genetics Department, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
Espeseth T Espeseth Thomas T Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
Fisher SE Fisher Simon E SE Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
Fladby T Fladby Tormod T University of Oslo, Lorenskog, Norway.
Frei O Frei Oleksandr O Norwegian Centre for Mental Disorders Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
Frouin V Frouin Vincent V Neurospin, Le Commissariat à l'énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives, Université Paris-Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette, France.
Fukunaga M Fukunaga Masaki M Department of Life Science, Sokendai, Hayama, Japan.
Gareau T Gareau Thomas T Neurospin, Le Commissariat à l'énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives, Université Paris-Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette, France.
Glahn DC Glahn David C DC Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
Grabe HJ Grabe Hans J HJ German Center of Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Rostock/Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany.
Groenewold NA Groenewold Nynke A NA Department of Psychiatry and Neuroscience Institute, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, Western Cape, South Africa.
Gústafsson Ó Gústafsson Ómar deCODE Genetics, Reykjavík, Iceland.
Haavik J Haavik Jan J Division of Psychiatry, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
Haberg AK Haberg Asta K AK St Olav's Hospital, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Trondheim, Norway.
Hashimoto R Hashimoto Ryota R Osaka University, Osaka, Japan.
Hehir-Kwa JY Hehir-Kwa Jayne Y JY Princess Máxima Center for Pediatric Oncology, Utrecht, the Netherlands.
Hibar DP Hibar Derrek P DP Genentech, San Francisco, California.
Hillegers MHJ Hillegers Manon H J MHJ Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry/Psychology, Erasmus MC-Sophia's Children's Hospital, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.
Hoffmann P Hoffmann Per P Institute of Medical Genetics and Pathology, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
Holleran L Holleran Laurena L Centre for Neuroimaging and Cognitive Genomics, School of Psychology and Discipline of Biochemistry, National University of Ireland Galway, Galway, Ireland.
Hottenga JJ Hottenga Jouke-Jan JJ Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, VU Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
Hulshoff Pol HE Hulshoff Pol Hilleke E HE Department of Psychiatry, UMC Brain Center, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands.
Ikeda M Ikeda Masashi M Department of Psychiatry, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Toyoake, Japan.
Jacquemont S Jacquemont Sébastien S Department of Pediatrics, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Jahanshad N Jahanshad Neda N Imaging Genetics Center, Mark and Mary Stevens Institute for Neuroimaging and Informatics, University of Southern California, Los Angeles.
Jockwitz C Jockwitz Christiane C Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, RWTH Aachen University, Medical Faculty, Aachen, Germany.
Johansson S Johansson Stefan S Department of Medical Genetics, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
Jönsson EG Jönsson Erik G EG Centre for Psychiatric Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Kikuchi M Kikuchi Masataka M Department of Genome Informatics, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan.
Knowles EEM Knowles Emma E M EEM Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
Kwok JB Kwok John B JB School of Medical Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.
Le Hellard S Le Hellard Stephanie S Dr Einar Martens Research Group for Biological Psychiatry, Department of Medical Genetics, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
Linden DEJ Linden David E J DEJ MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics, Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom.
Liu J Liu Jingyu J Tri-institutional Center for Translational Research in Neuroimaging and Data Science (TReNDS), Georgia State University, Georgia Institute of Technology, Emory University, Atlanta.
Lundervold A Lundervold Arvid A Mohn Medical Imaging and Visualization Centre, Department of Radiology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
Lundervold AJ Lundervold Astri J AJ Department of Biological and Medical Psychology, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
Martin NG Martin Nicholas G NG Genetic Epidemiology, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Australia.
Mather KA Mather Karen A KA Neuroscience Research Australia, Randwick, Australia.
Mathias SR Mathias Samuel R SR Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
McMahon KL McMahon Katie L KL Herston Imaging Research Facility and School of Clinical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.
McRae AF McRae Allan F AF Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
Medland SE Medland Sarah E SE Psychiatric Genetics, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Australia.
Moberget T Moberget Torgeir T Norwegian Centre for Mental Disorders Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
Moreau C Moreau Clara C Centre de recherche de l'Institut universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Morris DW Morris Derek W DW Centre for Neuroimaging and Cognitive Genomics, School of Psychology and Discipline of Biochemistry, National University of Ireland Galway, Galway, Ireland.
Mühleisen TW Mühleisen Thomas W TW Department of Biomedicine, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
Murray RM Murray Robin M RM Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, United Kingdom.
Nordvik JE Nordvik Jan E JE The CatoSenteret Rehabilitation Center, Son, Norway.
Nyberg L Nyberg Lars L Department of Radiation Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Olde Loohuis LM Olde Loohuis Loes M LM Center for Neurobehavioral Genetics, University of California, Los Angeles.
Ophoff RA Ophoff Roel A RA Center for Neurobehavioral Genetics, University of California, Los Angeles.
Owen MJ Owen Michael J MJ MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics, Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom.
Paus T Paus Tomas T Physiology and Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Pausova Z Pausova Zdenka Z Physiology and Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Peralta JM Peralta Juan M JM South Texas Diabetes and Obesity Institute, Department of Human Genetics, School of Medicine, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Brownsville.
Pike B Pike Bruce B Department of Radiology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Prieto C Prieto Carlos C Bioinformatics Service, Nucleus, University of Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain.
Quinlan EB Quinlan Erin Burke EB Centre for Population Neuroscience and Precision Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, United Kingdom.
Reinbold CS Reinbold Céline S CS Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
Reis Marques T Reis Marques Tiago T Psychiatric Imaging Group, MRC London Institute of Medical Sciences, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
Rucker JJH Rucker James J H JJH Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, United Kingdom.
Sachdev PS Sachdev Perminder S PS Neuropsychiatric Institute, The Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney, Australia.
Sando SB Sando Sigrid B SB Department of Neurology, University Hospital of Trondheim, Trondheim, Norway.
Schofield PR Schofield Peter R PR Neuroscience Research Australia, Sydney, Australia.
Schork AJ Schork Andrew J AJ Institute for Biological Psychiatry, Roskilde, Denmark.
Schumann G Schumann Gunter G Centre for Population Neuroscience and Precision Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, United Kingdom.
Shin J Shin Jean J Physiology and Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Shumskaya E Shumskaya Elena E Department of Human Genetics, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
Silva AI Silva Ana I AI Neuroscience and Mental Health Research Institute, Cardiff, United Kingdom.
Sisodiya SM Sisodiya Sanjay M SM Department of Clinical and Experimental Epilepsy, UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology and Chalfont Centre for Epilepsy, London, United Kingdom.
Steen VM Steen Vidar M VM Dr Einar Martens Research Group for Biological Psychiatry, Department of Medical Genetics, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
Stein DJ Stein Dan J DJ South African Medical Research Council Unit on Risk and Resilience in Mental Disorders, Department of Psychiatry and Neuroscience Institute, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
Strike LT Strike Lachlan T LT Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
Tamnes CK Tamnes Christian K CK Department of Psychiatry, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Teumer A Teumer Alexander A Institute for Community Medicine, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany.
Thalamuthu A Thalamuthu Anbupalam A Centre for Healthy Brain Ageing, School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.
Tordesillas-Gutiérrez D Tordesillas-Gutiérrez Diana D Neuroimaging Unit, Technological Facilities, Valdecilla Biomedical Research Institute, IdahoIVAL, Santander, Spain.
Uhlmann A Uhlmann Anne A Department of Psychiatry and Neuroscience Institute, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, Western Cape, South Africa.
Úlfarsson MÖ Úlfarsson Magnús Ö M Faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland.
van 't Ent D van 't Ent Dennis D Amsterdam Neuroscience, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
van den Bree MBM van den Bree Marianne B M MBM School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom.
Vassos E Vassos Evangelos E National Institute for Health Research, Mental Health Biomedical Research Centre, South London and Maudsley National Health Service Foundation Trust and King's College London, London, United Kingdom.
Wen W Wen Wei W Centre for Healthy Brain Ageing, School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.
Wittfeld K Wittfeld Katharina K German Center of Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Rostock/Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany.
Wright MJ Wright Margaret J MJ Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
Zayats T Zayats Tetyana T Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Boston, Massachusetts.
Dale AM Dale Anders M AM Center for Multimodal Imaging and Genetics, University of California, San Diego.
Djurovic S Djurovic Srdjan S Department of Medical Genetics, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Agartz I Agartz Ingrid I Department of Psychiatry, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Westlye LT Westlye Lars T LT Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
Stefánsson H Stefánsson Hreinn H deCODE Genetics, Reykjavík, Iceland.
Stefánsson K Stefánsson Kári K Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland.
Thompson PM Thompson Paul M PM Imaging Genetics Center, Mark and Mary Stevens Institute for Neuroimaging and Informatics, University of Southern California, Los Angeles.
Andreassen OA Andreassen Ole A OA Norwegian Centre for Mental Disorders Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
INVESTIGATORS
JOURNAL
VOLUME:
ISSUE:
TITLE: JAMA psychiatry
ISOABBREVIATION: JAMA Psychiatry
YEAR: 2019
MONTH: Oct
DAY: 30
MEDLINEDATE:
SEASON:
CITEDMEDIUM: Internet
ISSN: 2168-6238
ISSNTYPE: Electronic
MEDLINE JOURNAL
MEDLINETA: JAMA Psychiatry
COUNTRY: United States
ISSNLINKING: 2168-622X
NLMUNIQUEID: 101589550
PUBLICATION TYPE
PUBLICATIONTYPE TEXT
Journal Article
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