Genetic Epidemiology, Translational Neurogenomics, Psychiatric Genetics and Statistical Genetics Laboratories investigate the pattern of disease in families, particularly identical and non-identical twins, to assess the relative importance of genes and environment in a variety of important health problems.
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PMID
31094546
TITLE
Big Five personality traits and alcohol, nicotine, cannabis, and gambling disorder comorbidity.
ABSTRACT
The ; 5th ed.) reassignment of gambling disorder as an addictive disorder alongside the substance-related addictive disorders encourages research into their shared etiologies. The aims of this study were to examine: (a) the associations of Big Five personality dimensions with alcohol, nicotine, cannabis, and gambling disorders, (b) the comorbidity between these disorders, (c) the extent to which common personality underpinnings explain comorbidity, (d) whether results differed for men and women, and (e) the magnitude of personality differences corresponding to the 4 disorders. Participants were 3,785 twins and siblings (1,365 men, 2,420 women; M = 32 years, range = 21-46 years) from the Australian Twin Registry who completed psychiatric interviews and Big Five personality inventories. The personality profile of high neuroticism, low agreeableness, and low conscientiousness was associated with all 4 addictive disorders. All but 1 of the pairwise associations between the disorders were significant. After accounting for Big Five traits, the associations were attenuated to varying degrees but remained significant. The results were generally similar for men and women. The results suggest that the Big Five traits of neuroticism, agreeableness, and conscientiousness are associated with the general propensity to develop an addictive disorder and may in part explain their co-occurrence; however, they may be more broadly associated with the propensity for any psychiatric disorder. The effect sizes of the personality associations suggest that the diagnosis of gambling disorder as operationalized by the may be more severe than the other addictive disorders. Calibration of the diagnosis of gambling disorder to the other addictive disorders may be warranted. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved).
DATE PUBLISHED
2019 Jun
HISTORY
PUBSTATUS PUBSTATUSDATE
pubmed 2019/05/17 06:00
medline 2019/05/17 06:00
entrez 2019/05/17 06:00
AUTHORS
NAME COLLECTIVENAME LASTNAME FORENAME INITIALS AFFILIATION AFFILIATIONINFO
Dash GF Dash Genevieve F GF Department of Psychological Sciences.
Slutske WS Slutske Wendy S WS Department of Psychological Sciences.
Martin NG Martin Nicholas G NG Queensland Institute of Medical Research Berghofer.
Statham DJ Statham Dixie J DJ Department of Psychology.
Agrawal A Agrawal Arpana A Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences.
Lynskey MT Lynskey Michael T MT Department of Addictions.
INVESTIGATORS
JOURNAL
VOLUME: 33
ISSUE: 4
TITLE: Psychology of addictive behaviors : journal of the Society of Psychologists in Addictive Behaviors
ISOABBREVIATION: Psychol Addict Behav
YEAR: 2019
MONTH: Jun
DAY:
MEDLINEDATE:
SEASON:
CITEDMEDIUM: Internet
ISSN: 1939-1501
ISSNTYPE: Electronic
MEDLINE JOURNAL
MEDLINETA: Psychol Addict Behav
COUNTRY: United States
ISSNLINKING: 0893-164X
NLMUNIQUEID: 8802734
PUBLICATION TYPE
PUBLICATIONTYPE TEXT
Journal Article
COMMENTS AND CORRECTIONS
GRANTS
GRANTID AGENCY COUNTRY
National Institute on Drug Abuse
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
National Center for Responsible Gaming
GENERAL NOTE
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