Genetic Epidemiology, Psychiatric Genetics, Asthma Genetics and Statistical Genetics Laboratories investigate the pattern of disease in families, particularly identical and non-identical twins, to assess the relative importance of genes and environment in a variety of important health problems.
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PMID
30079878
TITLE
A Multivariate Behavior Genetic Investigation of Dual-Systems Models of Alcohol Involvement.
ABSTRACT
OBJECTIVE NlmCategory: OBJECTIVE
Dual-systems models hypothesize that individuals who tend to be drawn to risky behavior and are low in self-control are at greatest risk for alcohol use disorder (AUD). Importantly, these models assume that behavioral approach tendencies and self-control are distinct. This study investigated hypotheses and assumptions central to dual-systems models.
METHOD NlmCategory: METHODS
Participants were 3,509 members of a national twin registry (58% female). Structured interviews assessed alcohol use and AUD symptoms. Self-report questionnaires assessed individual differences in approach tendencies, namely for general risky behavior (sensation seeking) and substance use (positive expectancies), and behavioral control. Regression models tested nonadditive, interaction effects on alcohol involvement, as proposed by the dual-systems model. Multivariate behavior genetic models investigated the incremental validity of these interaction effects and whether approach tendencies and behavioral control explain distinct variance in alcohol involvement.
RESULTS NlmCategory: RESULTS
In regression models, we found interaction effects consistent with the dual-systems model for women but in the opposite direction for men. After accounting for additive main effects in behavior genetic models, however, these interaction effects played a negligible role phenotypically and genetically. Further, sensation seeking and positive expectancies explained phenotypic and genetic variance in alcohol involvement that was distinct from behavioral control. Behavioral control, however, did not explain distinct variance in alcohol involvement.
CONCLUSIONS NlmCategory: CONCLUSIONS
Contrary to dual-systems models, this study suggests that all of the variance in alcohol involvement explained by behavioral control is also shared with the tendency to engage in risky behavior (sensation seeking) and substance use (positive expectancies). Further, interaction effects central to dual-systems models failed to explain additional variance beyond basic main effects. Thus, more parsimonious models may better explain AUD.
DATE PUBLISHED
2018 Jul
HISTORY
PUBSTATUS PUBSTATUSDATE
entrez 2018/08/07 06:00
pubmed 2018/08/07 06:00
medline 2018/08/07 06:00
AUTHORS
NAME COLLECTIVENAME LASTNAME FORENAME INITIALS AFFILIATION AFFILIATIONINFO
Ellingson JM Ellingson Jarrod M JM Department of Psychology & Neuroscience, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado.
Slutske WS Slutske Wendy S WS Department of Psychological Sciences, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri.
Vergés A Vergés Alvaro A Escuela de Psicología, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile.
Littlefield AK Littlefield Andrew K AK Department of Psychological Sciences, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas.
Statham DJ Statham Dixie J DJ University of the Sunshine Coast, Maroochydore, Australia.
Martin NG Martin Nicholas G NG Genetic Epidemiology Laboratory, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Australia.
INVESTIGATORS
JOURNAL
VOLUME: 79
ISSUE: 4
TITLE: Journal of studies on alcohol and drugs
ISOABBREVIATION: J Stud Alcohol Drugs
YEAR: 2018
MONTH: Jul
DAY:
MEDLINEDATE:
SEASON:
CITEDMEDIUM: Internet
ISSN: 1938-4114
ISSNTYPE: Electronic
MEDLINE JOURNAL
MEDLINETA: J Stud Alcohol Drugs
COUNTRY: United States
ISSNLINKING: 1937-1888
NLMUNIQUEID: 101295847
PUBLICATION TYPE
PUBLICATIONTYPE TEXT
Journal Article
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