Genetic Epidemiology, Psychiatric Genetics, Asthma Genetics and Statistical Genetics Laboratories investigate the pattern of disease in families, particularly identical and non-identical twins, to assess the relative importance of genes and environment in a variety of important health problems.
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PMID
29691937
TITLE
Testing associations between cannabis use and subcortical volumes in two large population-based samples.
ABSTRACT
BACKGROUND AND AIMS NlmCategory: OBJECTIVE
Disentangling the putative impact of cannabis on brain morphology from other comorbid substance use is critical. After controlling for the effects of nicotine, alcohol and multi-substance use, this study aimed to determine whether frequent cannabis use is associated with significantly smaller subcortical grey matter volumes.
DESIGN NlmCategory: METHODS
Exploratory analyses using mixed linear models, one per region of interest (ROI), were performed whereby individual differences in volume (outcome) at seven subcortical ROIs were regressed onto cannabis and comorbid substance use (predictors).
SETTING NlmCategory: METHODS
Two large population-based twin samples from the United States and Australia.
PARTICIPANTS NlmCategory: METHODS
) of predominately Anglo-Saxon ancestry with complete substance use and imaging data. Subjects with a history of stroke or traumatic brain injury were excluded.
MEASUREMENTS NlmCategory: METHODS
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and volumetric segmentation methods were used to estimate volume in seven subcortical ROIs: thalamus; caudate nucleus; putamen; pallidum; hippocampus; amygdala; and nucleus accumbens. Substance use measurements included maximum nicotine and alcohol use, total lifetime multi-substance use, maximum cannabis use in the young adults, and regular cannabis use in the middle-age males.
FINDINGS NlmCategory: RESULTS
After correcting for multiple testing (p=0.007), cannabis use was unrelated to any subcortical ROI. However, maximum nicotine use was associated with significantly smaller thalamus volumes in middle-age males.
CONCLUSIONS NlmCategory: CONCLUSIONS
In exploratory analyses based on young adult and middle age samples, normal variation in cannabis use is statistically unrelated to individual differences in brain morphology as measured by subcortical volume.
This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
DATE PUBLISHED
2018 Apr 24
HISTORY
PUBSTATUS PUBSTATUSDATE
received 2017/02/13
revised 2018/02/09
accepted 2018/03/26
entrez 2018/04/26 06:00
pubmed 2018/04/25 06:00
medline 2018/04/25 06:00
AUTHORS
NAME COLLECTIVENAME LASTNAME FORENAME INITIALS AFFILIATION AFFILIATIONINFO
Gillespie NA Gillespie Nathan A NA QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, QLD, Australia.
Neale MC Neale Michael C MC Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavior Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, VA, USA.
Bates TC Bates Timothy C TC Department of Psychology, University of Edinburgh, EH8 9JZ, UK.
Eyler LT Eyler Lisa T LT Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Diego, CA, USA.
Fennema-Notestine C Fennema-Notestine Christine C Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Diego, CA, USA.
Vassileva J Vassileva Jasmin J Institute for Drug and Alcohol Studies, Virginia Commonwealth University, VA, USA.
Lyons MJ Lyons Michael J MJ Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Boston University, Boston, MA, USA.
Prom-Wormley EC Prom-Wormley Elizabeth C EC Department of Family Medicine and Population Health, Virginia Commonwealth University, VA, USA.
McMahon KL McMahon Katie L KL Centre for Advanced Imaging, The University of Queensland, QLD, Australia.
Thompson PM Thompson Paul M PM Centre for Advanced Imaging, The University of Queensland, QLD, Australia.
de Zubicaray G de Zubicaray Greig G Faculty of Health and Institute of Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology.
Hickie IB Hickie Ian B IB Brain and Mind Research Institute, University of Sydney, NSW, Australia.
McGrath JJ McGrath John J JJ Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, QLD, Australia.
Strike LT Strike Lachlan T LT School of Psychology, The University of Queensland, QLD, Australia.
Rentería ME Rentería Miguel E ME QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, QLD, Australia.
Panizzon MS Panizzon Matthew S MS Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Diego, CA, USA.
Martin NG Martin Nicholas G NG QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, QLD, Australia.
Franz CE Franz Carol E CE Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Diego, CA, USA.
Kremen WS Kremen William S WS Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Diego, CA, USA.
Wright MJ Wright Margaret J MJ Centre for Advanced Imaging, The University of Queensland, QLD, Australia.
INVESTIGATORS
JOURNAL
VOLUME:
ISSUE:
TITLE: Addiction (Abingdon, England)
ISOABBREVIATION: Addiction
YEAR: 2018
MONTH: Apr
DAY: 24
MEDLINEDATE:
SEASON:
CITEDMEDIUM: Internet
ISSN: 1360-0443
ISSNTYPE: Electronic
MEDLINE JOURNAL
MEDLINETA: Addiction
COUNTRY: England
ISSNLINKING: 0965-2140
NLMUNIQUEID: 9304118
PUBLICATION TYPE
PUBLICATIONTYPE TEXT
Journal Article
COMMENTS AND CORRECTIONS
GRANTS
GENERAL NOTE
KEYWORDS
KEYWORD
brain volume
cannabis use
gray matter
imaging
multi-substance use
subcortical
MESH HEADINGS
SUPPLEMENTARY MESH
GENE SYMBOLS
CHEMICALS
OTHER ID's