Genetic Epidemiology, Psychiatric Genetics, Asthma Genetics and Statistical Genetics Laboratories investigate the pattern of disease in families, particularly identical and non-identical twins, to assess the relative importance of genes and environment in a variety of important health problems.
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PMID
29550775
TITLE
Nineteen and Up study (19Up): understanding pathways to mental health disorders in young Australian twins.
ABSTRACT
PURPOSE NlmCategory: OBJECTIVE
The Nineteen and Up study (19Up) assessed a range of mental health and behavioural problems and associated risk factors in a genetically informative Australian cohort of young adult twins and their non-twin siblings. As such, 19Up enables detailed investigation of genetic and environmental pathways to mental illness and substance misuse within the Brisbane Longitudinal Twin Sample (BLTS).
PARTICIPANTS NlmCategory: METHODS
Twins and their non-twin siblings from Queensland, Australia; mostly from European ancestry. Data were collected between 2009 and 2016 on 2773 participants (age range 18-38, 57.8% female, 372 complete monozygotic pairs, 493 dizygotic pairs, 640 non-twin siblings, 403 singleton twins).
FINDINGS TO DATE NlmCategory: UNASSIGNED
A structured clinical assessment (Composite International Diagnostic Interview) was used to collect lifetime prevalence of diagnostic statistical manual (4th edition) (DSM-IV) diagnoses of major depressive disorder, (hypo)mania, social anxiety, cannabis use disorder, alcohol use disorder, panic disorder and psychotic symptoms. Here, we further describe the comorbidities and ages of onset for these mental disorders. Notably, two-thirds of the sample reported one or more lifetime mental disorder.In addition, the 19Up study assessed general health, drug use, work activity, education level, personality, migraine/headaches, suicidal thoughts, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptomatology, sleep-wake patterns, romantic preferences, friendships, familial environment, stress, anorexia and bulimia as well as baldness, acne, asthma, endometriosis, joint flexibility and internet use.The overlap with previous waves of the BLTS means that 84% of the 19Up participants are genotyped, 36% imaged using multimodal MRI and most have been assessed for psychological symptoms at up to four time points. Furthermore, IQ is available for 57%, parental report of ADHD symptomatology for 100% and electroencephalography for 30%.
FUTURE PLANS NlmCategory: UNASSIGNED
The 19Up study complements a phenotypically rich, longitudinal collection of environmental and psychological risk factors. Future publications will explore hypotheses related to disease onset and development across the waves of the cohort. A follow-up study at 25+years is ongoing.
Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.
DATE PUBLISHED
2018 Mar 17
HISTORY
PUBSTATUS PUBSTATUSDATE
entrez 2018/03/19 06:00
pubmed 2018/03/20 06:00
medline 2018/03/20 06:00
AUTHORS
NAME COLLECTIVENAME LASTNAME FORENAME INITIALS AFFILIATION AFFILIATIONINFO
Couvy-Duchesne B Couvy-Duchesne Baptiste B QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
O'Callaghan V O'Callaghan Victoria V Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
Parker R Parker Richard R QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
Mills N Mills Natalie N School of Medicine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.
Kirk KM Kirk Katherine M KM QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
Scott J Scott Jan J Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, Newcastle, UK.
Vinkhuyzen A Vinkhuyzen Anna A Institute of Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
Hermens DF Hermens Daniel F DF Brain and Mind Centre, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
Lind PA Lind Penelope A PA QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
Davenport TA Davenport Tracey A TA Brain and Mind Centre, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
Burns JM Burns Jane M JM Young and Well CRC, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
Connell M Connell Melissa M UQCCR, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
Zietsch BP Zietsch Brendan P BP School of Psychology, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
Scott J Scott James J UQCCR, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
Wright MJ Wright Margaret J MJ Centre for Advanced Imaging, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
Medland SE Medland Sarah E SE QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
McGrath J McGrath John J Queensland Centre for Mental Health Research, The Park Centre for Mental Health, Wacol, Australia.
Martin NG Martin Nicholas G NG QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
Hickie IB Hickie Ian B IB Brain and Mind Centre, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
Gillespie NA Gillespie Nathan A NA Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, USA.
INVESTIGATORS
JOURNAL
VOLUME: 8
ISSUE: 3
TITLE: BMJ open
ISOABBREVIATION: BMJ Open
YEAR: 2018
MONTH: Mar
DAY: 17
MEDLINEDATE:
SEASON:
CITEDMEDIUM: Internet
ISSN: 2044-6055
ISSNTYPE: Electronic
MEDLINE JOURNAL
MEDLINETA: BMJ Open
COUNTRY: England
ISSNLINKING: 2044-6055
NLMUNIQUEID: 101552874
PUBLICATION TYPE
PUBLICATIONTYPE TEXT
Journal Article
COMMENTS AND CORRECTIONS
GRANTS
GENERAL NOTE
KEYWORDS
KEYWORD
comorbidity
prevalence
substance misuse
twins
MESH HEADINGS
SUPPLEMENTARY MESH
GENE SYMBOLS
CHEMICALS
OTHER ID's