Genetic Epidemiology, Psychiatric Genetics, Asthma Genetics and Statistical Genetics Laboratories investigate the pattern of disease in families, particularly identical and non-identical twins, to assess the relative importance of genes and environment in a variety of important health problems.
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PMID
28711986
TITLE
Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Associated with Reading Ability Show Connection to Socio-Economic Outcomes.
ABSTRACT
Impairments in reading and in language have negative consequences on life outcomes, but it is not known to what extent genetic effects influence this association. We constructed polygenic scores for difficulties with language and learning to read from genome-wide data in ~6,600 children, adolescents and young adults, and tested their association with health, socioeconomic outcomes and brain structure measures collected in adults (maximal N = 111,749). Polygenic risk of reading difficulties was associated with reduced income, educational attainment, self-rated health and verbal-numerical reasoning (p < 0.00055). Polygenic risk of language difficulties predicted income (p = 0.0005). The small effect sizes ranged 0.01-0.03 of a standard deviation, but these will increase as genetic studies for reading ability get larger. Polygenic scores for childhood cognitive ability and educational attainment were correlated with polygenic scores of reading and language (up to 0.09 and 0.05, respectively). But when they were included in the prediction models, the observed associations between polygenic reading and adult outcomes mostly remained. This suggests that the pathway from reading ability to social outcomes is not only via associated polygenic loads for general cognitive function and educational attainment. The presence of non-overlapping genetic effect is indicated by the genetic correlations of around 0.40 (childhood intelligence) and 0.70 (educational attainment) with reading ability. Mendelian randomization approaches will be important to dissociate any causal and moderating effects of reading and related traits on social outcomes.
DATE PUBLISHED
2017 Jul 15
HISTORY
PUBSTATUS PUBSTATUSDATE
received 2017/01/31
accepted 2017/06/24
entrez 2017/07/17 06:00
pubmed 2017/07/18 06:00
medline 2017/07/18 06:00
AUTHORS
NAME COLLECTIVENAME LASTNAME FORENAME INITIALS AFFILIATION AFFILIATIONINFO
Luciano M Luciano Michelle M Department of Psychology, School of Philosophy, Psychology and Language Sciences, Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, The University of Edinburgh, 7 George Square, Edinburgh, EH8 9JZ, UK. michelle.luciano@ed.ac.uk.
Hagenaars SP Hagenaars Saskia P SP Division of Psychiatry, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH10 5HF, UK.
Cox SR Cox Simon R SR Department of Psychology, School of Philosophy, Psychology and Language Sciences, Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, The University of Edinburgh, 7 George Square, Edinburgh, EH8 9JZ, UK.
Hill WD Hill William David WD Department of Psychology, School of Philosophy, Psychology and Language Sciences, Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, The University of Edinburgh, 7 George Square, Edinburgh, EH8 9JZ, UK.
Davies G Davies Gail G Department of Psychology, School of Philosophy, Psychology and Language Sciences, Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, The University of Edinburgh, 7 George Square, Edinburgh, EH8 9JZ, UK.
Harris SE Harris Sarah E SE Medical Genetics Section, University of Edinburgh Centre for Genomic and Experimental Medicine and MRC Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Western General Hospital, Crewe Road, Edinburgh, EH4 2XU, UK.
Deary IJ Deary Ian J IJ Department of Psychology, School of Philosophy, Psychology and Language Sciences, Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, The University of Edinburgh, 7 George Square, Edinburgh, EH8 9JZ, UK.
Evans DM Evans David M DM MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.
Martin NG Martin Nicholas G NG Genetic Epidemiology, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Australia.
Wright MJ Wright Margaret J MJ Queensland Brain Institute, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
Bates TC Bates Timothy C TC Department of Psychology, School of Philosophy, Psychology and Language Sciences, Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, The University of Edinburgh, 7 George Square, Edinburgh, EH8 9JZ, UK.
INVESTIGATORS
JOURNAL
VOLUME:
ISSUE:
TITLE: Behavior genetics
ISOABBREVIATION: Behav. Genet.
YEAR: 2017
MONTH: Jul
DAY: 15
MEDLINEDATE:
SEASON:
CITEDMEDIUM: Internet
ISSN: 1573-3297
ISSNTYPE: Electronic
MEDLINE JOURNAL
MEDLINETA: Behav Genet
COUNTRY: United States
ISSNLINKING: 0001-8244
NLMUNIQUEID: 0251711
PUBLICATION TYPE
PUBLICATIONTYPE TEXT
Journal Article
COMMENTS AND CORRECTIONS
GRANTS
GENERAL NOTE
KEYWORDS
KEYWORD
Cross-trait linkage disequilibrium regression
Genetic correlation
MRI
Polygenic scores
UK Biobank
MESH HEADINGS
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GENE SYMBOLS
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