Genetic Epidemiology, Psychiatric Genetics, Asthma Genetics and Statistical Genetics Laboratories investigate the pattern of disease in families, particularly identical and non-identical twins, to assess the relative importance of genes and environment in a variety of important health problems.
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PMID
27165950
TITLE
White Matter Hyperintensities Are Under Strong Genetic Influence.
ABSTRACT
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE NlmCategory: OBJECTIVE
The genetic basis of white matter hyperintensities (WMH) is still unknown. This study examines the heritability of WMH in both sexes and in different brain regions, and the influence of age.
METHODS NlmCategory: METHODS
Participants from the Older Australian Twins Study were recruited (n=320; 92 monozygotic and 68 dizygotic pairs) who volunteered for magnetic resonance imaging scans and medical assessments. Heritability, that is, the ratio of the additive genetic variance to the total phenotypic variance, was estimated using the twin design.
RESULTS NlmCategory: RESULTS
Heritability was high for total WMH volume (0.76), and for periventricular WMH (0.64) and deep WMH (0.77), and varied from 0.18 for the cerebellum to 0.76 for the occipital lobe. The genetic correlation between deep and periventricular WMH regions was 0.85, with one additive genetics factor accounting for most of the shared variance. Heritability was consistently higher in women in the cerebral regions. Heritability in deep but not periventricular WMH declined with age, in particular after the age of 75.
CONCLUSIONS NlmCategory: CONCLUSIONS
WMH have a strong genetic influence but this is not uniform through the brain, being higher for deep than periventricular WMH and in the cerebral regions. The genetic influence is higher in women, and there is an age-related decline, most markedly for deep WMH. The data suggest some heterogeneity in the pathogenesis of WMH for different brain regions and for men and women.
2016 American Heart Association, Inc.
DATE PUBLISHED
2016 Jun
HISTORY
PUBSTATUS PUBSTATUSDATE
received 2016/03/14
accepted 2016/04/14
entrez 2016/05/12 06:00
pubmed 2016/05/12 06:00
medline 2016/05/12 06:00
AUTHORS
NAME COLLECTIVENAME LASTNAME FORENAME INITIALS AFFILIATION AFFILIATIONINFO
Sachdev PS Sachdev Perminder S PS From the Centre for Healthy Brain Ageing (CHeBA), School of Psychiatry, UNSW Medicine, The University of New South Wales, Australia (P.S.S., A.T., K.A.M., W.W.); Neuropsychiatric Institute, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, New South Wales, Australia (P.S.S., W.W.); National Ageing Research Institute, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia (D.A.); NeuroImaging Genetics Laboratory, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston, Queensland, Australia (M.J.W.); and Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia (M.J.W.).New South WalesNew South WalesNew South WalesNew South WalesNew South WalesNew South WalesQueenslandQueenslandVictoria p.sachdev@unsw.edu.au.
Thalamuthu A Thalamuthu Anbupalam A From the Centre for Healthy Brain Ageing (CHeBA), School of Psychiatry, UNSW Medicine, The University of New South Wales, Australia (P.S.S., A.T., K.A.M., W.W.); Neuropsychiatric Institute, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, New South Wales, Australia (P.S.S., W.W.); National Ageing Research Institute, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia (D.A.); NeuroImaging Genetics Laboratory, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston, Queensland, Australia (M.J.W.); and Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia (M.J.W.).New South WalesNew South WalesNew South WalesNew South WalesNew South WalesNew South WalesQueenslandQueenslandVictoria.
Mather KA Mather Karen A KA From the Centre for Healthy Brain Ageing (CHeBA), School of Psychiatry, UNSW Medicine, The University of New South Wales, Australia (P.S.S., A.T., K.A.M., W.W.); Neuropsychiatric Institute, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, New South Wales, Australia (P.S.S., W.W.); National Ageing Research Institute, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia (D.A.); NeuroImaging Genetics Laboratory, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston, Queensland, Australia (M.J.W.); and Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia (M.J.W.).New South WalesNew South WalesNew South WalesNew South WalesNew South WalesNew South WalesQueenslandQueenslandVictoria.
Ames D Ames David D From the Centre for Healthy Brain Ageing (CHeBA), School of Psychiatry, UNSW Medicine, The University of New South Wales, Australia (P.S.S., A.T., K.A.M., W.W.); Neuropsychiatric Institute, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, New South Wales, Australia (P.S.S., W.W.); National Ageing Research Institute, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia (D.A.); NeuroImaging Genetics Laboratory, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston, Queensland, Australia (M.J.W.); and Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia (M.J.W.).New South WalesNew South WalesNew South WalesNew South WalesNew South WalesNew South WalesQueenslandQueenslandVictoria.
Wright MJ Wright Margaret J MJ From the Centre for Healthy Brain Ageing (CHeBA), School of Psychiatry, UNSW Medicine, The University of New South Wales, Australia (P.S.S., A.T., K.A.M., W.W.); Neuropsychiatric Institute, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, New South Wales, Australia (P.S.S., W.W.); National Ageing Research Institute, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia (D.A.); NeuroImaging Genetics Laboratory, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston, Queensland, Australia (M.J.W.); and Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia (M.J.W.).New South WalesNew South WalesNew South WalesNew South WalesNew South WalesNew South WalesQueenslandQueenslandVictoria.
Wen W Wen Wei W From the Centre for Healthy Brain Ageing (CHeBA), School of Psychiatry, UNSW Medicine, The University of New South Wales, Australia (P.S.S., A.T., K.A.M., W.W.); Neuropsychiatric Institute, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, New South Wales, Australia (P.S.S., W.W.); National Ageing Research Institute, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia (D.A.); NeuroImaging Genetics Laboratory, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston, Queensland, Australia (M.J.W.); and Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia (M.J.W.).New South WalesNew South WalesNew South WalesNew South WalesNew South WalesNew South WalesQueenslandQueenslandVictoria.
OATS Collaborative Research Team
INVESTIGATORS
LASTNAME FORENAME INITIALS AFFILIATION
Bowden Jocelyn J
Lee Teresa T
Brodaty Henry H
Crawford John J
Duckworth Tanya T
Kang Kristan K
Garden Natalie N
Martin Nick N
Lemmon Christel C
JOURNAL
VOLUME: 47
ISSUE: 6
TITLE: Stroke
ISOABBREVIATION: Stroke
YEAR: 2016
MONTH: Jun
DAY:
MEDLINEDATE:
SEASON:
CITEDMEDIUM: Internet
ISSN: 1524-4628
ISSNTYPE: Electronic
MEDLINE JOURNAL
MEDLINETA: Stroke
COUNTRY: United States
ISSNLINKING: 0039-2499
NLMUNIQUEID: 0235266
PUBLICATION TYPE
PUBLICATIONTYPE TEXT
Journal Article
COMMENTS AND CORRECTIONS
GRANTS
GENERAL NOTE
KEYWORDS
KEYWORD
aging
epidemiology
heritable quantitative trait
magnetic resonance imaging
white matter
MESH HEADINGS
SUPPLEMENTARY MESH
GENE SYMBOLS
CHEMICALS
OTHER ID's