Genetic Epidemiology, Psychiatric Genetics, Asthma Genetics and Statistical Genetics Laboratories investigate the pattern of disease in families, particularly identical and non-identical twins, to assess the relative importance of genes and environment in a variety of important health problems.
QIMR Home Page
GenEpi Home Page
Publications
Contacts
Research
Staff Index
Collaborators
Software Tools
Computing Resources
Studies
Search
GenEpi Intranet
PMID
26858521
TITLE
Facial averageness and genetic quality: Testing heritability, genetic correlation with attractiveness, and the paternal age effect.
ABSTRACT
NlmCategory: UNASSIGNED
Popular theory suggests that facial averageness is preferred in a partner for genetic benefits to offspring. However, whether facial averageness is associated with genetic quality is yet to be established. Here, we computed an objective measure of facial averageness for a large sample (N = 1,823) of identical and nonidentical twins and their siblings to test two predictions from the theory that facial averageness reflects genetic quality. First, we use biometrical modelling to estimate the heritability of facial averageness, which is necessary if it reflects genetic quality. We also test for a genetic association between facial averageness and facial attractiveness. Second, we assess whether paternal age at conception (a proxy of mutation load) is associated with facial averageness and facial attractiveness. Our findings are mixed with respect to our hypotheses. While we found that facial averageness does have a genetic component, and a significant phenotypic correlation exists between facial averageness and attractiveness, we did not find a genetic correlation between facial averageness and attractiveness (therefore, we cannot say that the genes that affect facial averageness also affect facial attractiveness) and paternal age at conception was not negatively associated with facial averageness. These findings support some of the previously untested assumptions of the 'genetic benefits' account of facial averageness, but cast doubt on others.
DATE PUBLISHED
2016 Jan 1
HISTORY
PUBSTATUS PUBSTATUSDATE
epublish 2015/08/28
entrez 2016/02/10 06:00
pubmed 2016/02/10 06:00
medline 2016/02/10 06:00
AUTHORS
NAME COLLECTIVENAME LASTNAME FORENAME INITIALS AFFILIATION AFFILIATIONINFO
Lee AJ Lee Anthony J AJ School of Psychology, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
Mitchem DG Mitchem Dorian G DG Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado, United States of America; Institute for Behavioral Genetics, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado, United States of America.
Wright MJ Wright Margaret J MJ QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
Martin NG Martin Nicholas G NG QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
Keller MC Keller Matthew C MC Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado, United States of America; Institute for Behavioral Genetics, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado, United States of America.
Zietsch BP Zietsch Brendan P BP School of Psychology, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
INVESTIGATORS
JOURNAL
VOLUME: 37
ISSUE: 1
TITLE: Evolution and human behavior : official journal of the Human Behavior and Evolution Society
ISOABBREVIATION: Evol. Hum. Behav.
YEAR: 2016
MONTH: Jan
DAY: 1
MEDLINEDATE:
SEASON:
CITEDMEDIUM: Print
ISSN: 1090-5138
ISSNTYPE: Print
MEDLINE JOURNAL
MEDLINETA: Evol Hum Behav
COUNTRY:
ISSNLINKING: 1090-5138
NLMUNIQUEID: 9709475
PUBLICATION TYPE
PUBLICATIONTYPE TEXT
JOURNAL ARTICLE
COMMENTS AND CORRECTIONS
GRANTS
GENERAL NOTE
KEYWORDS
KEYWORD
Mate preference
developmental stability
good genes
mutation load
physical attractiveness
twins
MESH HEADINGS
SUPPLEMENTARY MESH
GENE SYMBOLS
CHEMICALS
OTHER ID's