Genetic Epidemiology, Psychiatric Genetics, Asthma Genetics and Statistical Genetics Laboratories investigate the pattern of disease in families, particularly identical and non-identical twins, to assess the relative importance of genes and environment in a variety of important health problems.
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PMID
25251541
TITLE
Don't it make your brown eyes blue? A comparison of iris colour across latitude in Australian twins.
ABSTRACT
BACKGROUND NlmCategory: BACKGROUND
The aim was to determine whether latitudinal (Queensland versus Tasmania) variation in reported disease frequency in Australia may be biased by differences in population.
METHODS NlmCategory: METHODS
A retrospective analysis was conducted from data of two large Australian twin studies (n = 1,835) having undertaken ophthalmic examination, namely, Twins Eye Study in Tasmania (TEST) and the Brisbane Adolescent Twins Study (BATS). Ordinal logistic regression was used to compute odds ratios and predicted probabilities for each category of eye colour by state.
RESULTS NlmCategory: RESULTS
Tasmanian residence was associated with lower odds of darker iris colour (odds ratio 0.77, 95% CI [0.63-0.95]) signifying that participants living in Tasmania (TAS) are less likely to have darker-coloured irides than those residing in Queensland (QLD). For individuals living in Tasmania the predicted probability (TAS versus QLD) of having light blue eyes was greater (16.7 versus 13.3 per cent), approximately the same for green eyes and less for brown/dark brown-coloured eyes (6.2 versus 7.9 per cent).
CONCLUSIONS NlmCategory: CONCLUSIONS
We found a general trend of individuals living in the southern states (TAS/VIC) of Australia having lighter-coloured irides compared to those living in the north (QLD). This finding has potential implications for all epidemiological research conducted to explore differences in UV-associated disease frequency in Australia, as population heterogeneity may confound the estimates obtained.
2014 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Optometry 2014 Optometry Australia.
DATE PUBLISHED
2015 Mar
HISTORY
PUBSTATUS PUBSTATUSDATE
received 2014/04/28
revised 2014/06/05
accepted 2014/06/21
aheadofprint 2014/09/24
entrez 2014/09/25 06:00
pubmed 2014/09/25 06:00
medline 2015/12/15 06:00
AUTHORS
NAME COLLECTIVENAME LASTNAME FORENAME INITIALS AFFILIATION AFFILIATIONINFO
Sanfilippo PG Sanfilippo Paul G PG Lions Eye Institute, Centre for Ophthalmology and Visual Science, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia; Centre for Eye Research Australia, University of Melbourne, Department of Ophthalmology, Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital, Melbourne, Australia. prseye@gmail.com.
Wilkinson CH Wilkinson Colleen H CH
Ruddle JB Ruddle Jonathan B JB
Zhu G Zhu Gu G
Martin NG Martin Nicholas G NG
Hewitt AW Hewitt Alex W AW
Mackey DA Mackey David A DA
INVESTIGATORS
JOURNAL
VOLUME: 98
ISSUE: 2
TITLE: Clinical & experimental optometry
ISOABBREVIATION: Clin Exp Optom
YEAR: 2015
MONTH: Mar
DAY:
MEDLINEDATE:
SEASON:
CITEDMEDIUM: Internet
ISSN: 1444-0938
ISSNTYPE: Electronic
MEDLINE JOURNAL
MEDLINETA: Clin Exp Optom
COUNTRY: Australia
ISSNLINKING: 0816-4622
NLMUNIQUEID: 8703442
PUBLICATION TYPE
PUBLICATIONTYPE TEXT
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study
COMMENTS AND CORRECTIONS
GRANTS
GENERAL NOTE
KEYWORDS
KEYWORD
epidemiology
eye colour
iris
twins
MESH HEADINGS
DESCRIPTORNAME QUALIFIERNAME
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Eye Color physiology
Female physiology
Follow-Up Studies physiology
Humans physiology
Iris physiology
Male physiology
Middle Aged physiology
Queensland physiology
Retrospective Studies physiology
Tasmania physiology
Twins physiology
Young Adult physiology
SUPPLEMENTARY MESH
GENE SYMBOLS
CHEMICALS
OTHER ID's