Genetic Epidemiology, Psychiatric Genetics, Asthma Genetics and Statistical Genetics Laboratories investigate the pattern of disease in families, particularly identical and non-identical twins, to assess the relative importance of genes and environment in a variety of important health problems.
QIMR Home Page
GenEpi Home Page
Publications
Contacts
Research
Staff Index
Collaborators
Software Tools
Computing Resources
Studies
Search
GenEpi Intranet
PMID
25151025
TITLE
Contrast effects and sex influence maternal and self-report dimensional measures of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.
ABSTRACT
The heritability of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is higher for children than adults. This may be due to increasing importance of environment in symptom variation, measurement inaccuracy when two raters report behavior of a twin-pair, a contrast effect resulting from parental comparison of siblings and/or dimensionality of measures. We examine rater contrast and sex effects in ADHD subtypes using a dimensional scale and compare the aetiology of self, versus maternal-report. Data were collected using the Strengths and Weaknesses of ADHD and Normal Behaviour Scale (SWAN): maternal-report for 3,223 twins and siblings (mean age 21.2, SD = 6.3) and self-report for 1,617 twins and siblings (mean age 25.5, SD = 3.2). Contrast effects and magnitude of genetic and environmental contributions to variance of ADHD phenotypes (inattention, hyperactivity-impulsivity, combined behaviours) were examined using structural equation modeling. Contrast effects were evident for maternal-report hyperactivity-impulsivity (b = -0.04) and self-report inattention (-0.09) and combined ADHD (-0.08). Dominant genetic effects were shared by raters for inattention, hyperactivity-impulsivity and combined ADHD. Broad-sense heritability was equal across sex for maternal-report inattention, hyperactivity-impulsivity and combined ADHD (0.72, 0.83, 0.80). Heritability for corresponding subtypes in self-reported data were best represented by sex (0.46, 0.30, 0.39 for males; 0.69, 0.41, 0.65 for females). Heritability difference between maternal and self-report ADHD was due to greater variance of male specific environment in self-report data. Self-reported ADHD differed across sex by magnitude of specific environment and genetic effects.
DATE PUBLISHED
2015 Jan
HISTORY
PUBSTATUS PUBSTATUSDATE
received 2014/01/17
accepted 2014/07/30
aheadofprint 2014/08/24
entrez 2014/08/25 06:00
pubmed 2014/08/26 06:00
medline 2016/03/08 06:00
AUTHORS
NAME COLLECTIVENAME LASTNAME FORENAME INITIALS AFFILIATION AFFILIATIONINFO
Ebejer JL Ebejer J L JL Environmental and Rural Sciences, University of New England, Armidale, NSW, Australia, ebejer.j@gmail.com.
Medland SE Medland S E SE
van der Werf J van der Werf J J
J Wright M J Wright M M
Henders AK Henders A K AK
Gillespie NA Gillespie N A NA
Hickie IB Hickie I B IB
Martin NG Martin N G NG
Duffy DL Duffy D L DL
INVESTIGATORS
JOURNAL
VOLUME: 45
ISSUE: 1
TITLE: Behavior genetics
ISOABBREVIATION: Behav. Genet.
YEAR: 2015
MONTH: Jan
DAY:
MEDLINEDATE:
SEASON:
CITEDMEDIUM: Internet
ISSN: 1573-3297
ISSNTYPE: Electronic
MEDLINE JOURNAL
MEDLINETA: Behav Genet
COUNTRY: United States
ISSNLINKING: 0001-8244
NLMUNIQUEID: 0251711
PUBLICATION TYPE
PUBLICATIONTYPE TEXT
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study
COMMENTS AND CORRECTIONS
GRANTS
GENERAL NOTE
KEYWORDS
MESH HEADINGS
DESCRIPTORNAME QUALIFIERNAME
Adolescent
Adult
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity genetics
Child genetics
Data Collection genetics
Diseases in Twins genetics
Female genetics
Genes, Dominant genetics
Humans genetics
Impulsive Behavior genetics
Male genetics
Maternal Behavior genetics
Middle Aged genetics
Mothers genetics
Phenotype genetics
Retrospective Studies genetics
Sex Factors genetics
Siblings genetics
Young Adult genetics
SUPPLEMENTARY MESH
GENE SYMBOLS
CHEMICALS
OTHER ID's