Genetic Epidemiology, Psychiatric Genetics, Asthma Genetics and Statistical Genetics Laboratories investigate the pattern of disease in families, particularly identical and non-identical twins, to assess the relative importance of genes and environment in a variety of important health problems.
QIMR Home Page
GenEpi Home Page
Publications
Contacts
Research
Staff Index
Collaborators
Software Tools
Computing Resources
Studies
Search
GenEpi Intranet
PMID
25098862
TITLE
Genetic influences on alcohol-related hangover.
ABSTRACT
AIMS NlmCategory: OBJECTIVE
To quantify the relative contributions of genetic and environmental factors to alcohol hangover.
DESIGN NlmCategory: METHODS
Biometric models were used to partition the variance in hangover phenotypes.
SETTING NlmCategory: METHODS
A community-based sample of Australian twins.
PARTICIPANTS NlmCategory: METHODS
Members of the Australian Twin Registry, Cohort II who reported consuming alcohol in the past year when surveyed in 2004-07 (n = 4496).
MEASUREMENTS NlmCategory: METHODS
Telephone interviews assessed participants' frequency of drinking to intoxication and frequency of hangover the day after drinking. Analyses examined three phenotypes: hangover frequency, hangover susceptibility (i.e. residual variance in hangover frequency after accounting for intoxication frequency) and hangover resistance (a dichotomous variable defined as having been intoxicated at least once in the past year with no reported hangovers).
FINDINGS NlmCategory: RESULTS
Genetic factors accounted for 45% [95% confidence interval (CI) = 37-53%] and 40% (95% CI = 33-48%) of the variation in hangover frequency in men and women, respectively. Most of the genetic variation in hangover frequency overlapped with genetic contributions to intoxication frequency. Genetic influences accounted for 24% (95% CI = 14-35%) and 16% (95% CI = 8-25%) of the residual hangover susceptibility variance in men and women, respectively. Forty-three per cent (95% CI = 22-63%) of the variation in hangover resistance was explained by genetic influences, with no evidence for significant sex differences. There was no evidence for shared environmental influences for any of the hangover phenotypes.
CONCLUSIONS NlmCategory: CONCLUSIONS
Individual differences in the propensity to experience a hangover and of being resistant to hangover at a given level of alcohol use are genetically influenced.
2014 Society for the Study of Addiction.
DATE PUBLISHED
2014 Dec
HISTORY
PUBSTATUS PUBSTATUSDATE
received 2014/02/28
revised 2014/05/28
accepted 2014/07/24
aheadofprint 2014/09/10
entrez 2014/08/08 06:00
pubmed 2014/08/08 06:00
medline 2014/08/08 06:00
AUTHORS
NAME COLLECTIVENAME LASTNAME FORENAME INITIALS AFFILIATION AFFILIATIONINFO
Slutske WS Slutske Wendy S WS Department of Psychological Sciences, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, USA; Midwest Alcoholism Research Center, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, USA.
Piasecki TM Piasecki Thomas M TM
Nathanson L Nathanson Lisa L
Statham DJ Statham Dixie J DJ
Martin NG Martin Nicholas G NG
INVESTIGATORS
JOURNAL
VOLUME: 109
ISSUE: 12
TITLE: Addiction (Abingdon, England)
ISOABBREVIATION: Addiction
YEAR: 2014
MONTH: Dec
DAY:
MEDLINEDATE:
SEASON:
CITEDMEDIUM: Internet
ISSN: 1360-0443
ISSNTYPE: Electronic
MEDLINE JOURNAL
MEDLINETA: Addiction
COUNTRY: England
ISSNLINKING: 0965-2140
NLMUNIQUEID: 9304118
PUBLICATION TYPE
PUBLICATIONTYPE TEXT
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
COMMENTS AND CORRECTIONS
GRANTS
GRANTID AGENCY COUNTRY
MH66206 NIMH NIH HHS United States
GENERAL NOTE
KEYWORDS
KEYWORD
Alcohol consequences
alcohol use
genetic
hangover
hangover resistance
hangover vulnerability
twins
MESH HEADINGS
SUPPLEMENTARY MESH
GENE SYMBOLS
CHEMICALS
OTHER ID's