Genetic Epidemiology, Psychiatric Genetics, Asthma Genetics and Statistical Genetics Laboratories investigate the pattern of disease in families, particularly identical and non-identical twins, to assess the relative importance of genes and environment in a variety of important health problems.
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PMID
25032841
TITLE
Genetic variation associated with differential educational attainment in adults has anticipated associations with school performance in children.
ABSTRACT
Genome-wide association study results have yielded evidence for the association of common genetic variants with crude measures of completed educational attainment in adults. Whilst informative, these results do not inform as to the mechanism of these effects or their presence at earlier ages and where educational performance is more routinely and more precisely assessed. Single nucleotide polymorphisms exhibiting genome-wide significant associations with adult educational attainment were combined to derive an unweighted allele score in 5,979 and 6,145 young participants from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children with key stage 3 national curriculum test results (SATS results) available at age 13 to 14 years in English and mathematics respectively. Standardised (z-scored) results for English and mathematics showed an expected relationship with sex, with girls exhibiting an advantage over boys in English (0.433 SD (95%CI 0.395, 0.470), p<10(-10)) with more similar results (though in the opposite direction) in mathematics (0.042 SD (95%CI 0.004, 0.080), p = 0.030). Each additional adult educational attainment increasing allele was associated with 0.041 SD (95%CI 0.020, 0.063), p = 1.79×10(-04) and 0.028 SD (95%CI 0.007, 0.050), p = 0.01 increases in standardised SATS score for English and mathematics respectively. Educational attainment is a complex multifactorial behavioural trait which has not had heritable contributions to it fully characterised. We were able to apply the results from a large study of adult educational attainment to a study of child exam performance marking events in the process of learning rather than realised adult end product. Our results support evidence for common, small genetic contributions to educational attainment, but also emphasise the likely lifecourse nature of this genetic effect. Results here also, by an alternative route, suggest that existing methods for child examination are able to recognise early life variation likely to be related to ultimate educational attainment.
DATE PUBLISHED
2014
HISTORY
PUBSTATUS PUBSTATUSDATE
received 2014/02/03
accepted 2014/05/22
entrez 2014/07/18 06:00
pubmed 2014/07/18 06:00
medline 2015/12/19 06:00
AUTHORS
NAME COLLECTIVENAME LASTNAME FORENAME INITIALS AFFILIATION AFFILIATIONINFO
Ward ME Ward Mary E ME MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit at the University of Bristol, School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
McMahon G McMahon George G MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit at the University of Bristol, School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
St Pourcain B St Pourcain Beate B MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit at the University of Bristol, School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom; School of Oral and Dental Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom; School of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
Evans DM Evans David M DM MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit at the University of Bristol, School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom; University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, Translational Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
Rietveld CA Rietveld Cornelius A CA Department of Applied Economics, Erasmus School of Economics, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Rotterdam, Netherlands; Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
Benjamin DJ Benjamin Daniel J DJ Department of Economics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, United States of America.
Koellinger PD Koellinger Philipp D PD Department of Applied Economics, Erasmus School of Economics, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Rotterdam, Netherlands; Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands; Amsterdam Business School, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
Cesarini D Cesarini David D Center for Experimental Social Science, Department of Economics, New York University, New York, New York, United States of America; Division of Social Science, New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates; Research Institute of Industrial Economics, Stockholm, Sweden.
Social Science Genetic Association Consortium
Davey Smith G Davey Smith George G MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit at the University of Bristol, School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
Timpson NJ Timpson Nicholas J NJ MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit at the University of Bristol, School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
INVESTIGATORS
JOURNAL
VOLUME: 9
ISSUE: 7
TITLE: PloS one
ISOABBREVIATION: PLoS ONE
YEAR: 2014
MONTH:
DAY:
MEDLINEDATE:
SEASON:
CITEDMEDIUM: Internet
ISSN: 1932-6203
ISSNTYPE: Electronic
MEDLINE JOURNAL
MEDLINETA: PLoS One
COUNTRY: United States
ISSNLINKING: 1932-6203
NLMUNIQUEID: 101285081
PUBLICATION TYPE
PUBLICATIONTYPE TEXT
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
COMMENTS AND CORRECTIONS
REFTYPE REFSOURCE REFPMID NOTE
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GRANTS
GRANTID AGENCY COUNTRY
092731 Wellcome Trust United Kingdom
MC_UU_12013/3 Medical Research Council United Kingdom
102215 Wellcome Trust United Kingdom
099873/Z/12/Z Wellcome Trust United Kingdom
MC_PC_15018 Medical Research Council United Kingdom
MC_UU_12013/1 Medical Research Council United Kingdom
MC_UU_12013/4 Medical Research Council United Kingdom
GENERAL NOTE
KEYWORDS
MESH HEADINGS
DESCRIPTORNAME QUALIFIERNAME
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Educational Status
Female
Genetic Association Studies
Genome-Wide Association Study
Humans
Intelligence genetics
Intelligence Tests genetics
Learning genetics
Longitudinal Studies genetics
Male genetics
Mathematics genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide genetics
SUPPLEMENTARY MESH
GENE SYMBOLS
CHEMICALS
OTHER ID's
OTHERID SOURCE
PMC4102483 NLM