Genetic Epidemiology, Translational Neurogenomics, Psychiatric Genetics and Statistical Genetics Laboratories investigate the pattern of disease in families, particularly identical and non-identical twins, to assess the relative importance of genes and environment in a variety of important health problems.
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PMID
23067261
TITLE
A study of changes in genetic and environmental influences on weight and shape concern across adolescence.
ABSTRACT
The goal of the current study was to examine whether genetic and environmental influences on an important risk factor for disordered eating, weight and shape concern, remained stable over adolescence. This stability was assessed in 2 ways: whether new sources of latent variance were introduced over development and whether the magnitude of variance contributing to the risk factor changed. We examined an 8-item WSC subscale derived from the Eating Disorder Examination (EDE) using telephone interviews with female adolescents. From 3 waves of data collected from female-female same-sex twin pairs from the Australian Twin Registry, a subset of the data (which included 351 pairs at Wave 1) was used to examine 3 age cohorts: 12 to 13, 13 to 15, and 14 to 16 years. The best-fitting model contained genetic and environmental influences, both shared and nonshared. Biometric model fitting indicated that nonshared environmental influences were largely specific to each age cohort, and results suggested that latent shared environmental and genetic influences that were influential at 12 to 13 years continued to contribute to subsequent age cohorts, with independent sources of both emerging at ages 13 to 15. The magnitude of all 3 latent influences could be constrained to be the same across adolescence. Ages 13 to 15 were indicated as a time of risk for the development of high levels of WSC, given that most specific environmental risk factors were significant at this time (e.g., peer teasing about weight, adverse life events), and indications of the emergence of new sources of latent genetic and environmental variance over this period.
2013 APA, all rights reserved
DATE PUBLISHED
2013 Feb
HISTORY
PUBSTATUS PUBSTATUSDATE
aheadofprint 2012/10/15
entrez 2012/10/17 06:00
pubmed 2012/10/17 06:00
medline 2013/11/19 06:00
AUTHORS
NAME COLLECTIVENAME LASTNAME FORENAME INITIALS AFFILIATION AFFILIATIONINFO
Wade TD Wade Tracey D TD School of Psychology, Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. tracey.wade@flinders.edu.au
Hansell NK Hansell Narelle K NK
Crosby RD Crosby Ross D RD
Bryant-Waugh R Bryant-Waugh Rachel R
Treasure J Treasure Janet J
Nixon R Nixon Reginald R
Byrne S Byrne Susan S
Martin NG Martin Nicholas G NG
INVESTIGATORS
JOURNAL
VOLUME: 122
ISSUE: 1
TITLE: Journal of abnormal psychology
ISOABBREVIATION: J Abnorm Psychol
YEAR: 2013
MONTH: Feb
DAY:
MEDLINEDATE:
SEASON:
CITEDMEDIUM: Internet
ISSN: 1939-1846
ISSNTYPE: Electronic
MEDLINE JOURNAL
MEDLINETA: J Abnorm Psychol
COUNTRY: United States
ISSNLINKING: 0021-843X
NLMUNIQUEID: 0034461
PUBLICATION TYPE
PUBLICATIONTYPE TEXT
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study
COMMENTS AND CORRECTIONS
GRANTS
GENERAL NOTE
KEYWORDS
MESH HEADINGS
DESCRIPTORNAME QUALIFIERNAME
Adolescent
Body Image psychology
Body Size genetics
Body Weight genetics
Child genetics
Eating Disorders psychology
Female psychology
Gene-Environment Interaction psychology
Humans psychology
Longitudinal Studies psychology
Multivariate Analysis psychology
Questionnaires psychology
Risk Factors psychology
Twins psychology
SUPPLEMENTARY MESH
GENE SYMBOLS
CHEMICALS
OTHER ID's