Genetic Epidemiology, Translational Neurogenomics, Psychiatric Genetics and Statistical Genetics Laboratories investigate the pattern of disease in families, particularly identical and non-identical twins, to assess the relative importance of genes and environment in a variety of important health problems.
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PMID
22985012
TITLE
Genetic overlap between personality and risk for disordered gambling: evidence from a national community-based Australian twin study.
ABSTRACT
Using data from a large Australian twin sample we examined the extent to which genetic variation in the Big Three personality dimensions (positive emotionality, negative emotionality, and constraint) and their lower-order components explained genetic variation in the risk for disordered gambling (DG) among men and women. Genetic influences contributing to individual differences in normal-range personality traits explained over 40% of the genetic risk for DG, with a larger contribution among women than among men. The largest and most robust contributions came from the higher-order personality dimension of negative emotionality and its two lower-order dimensions of alienation and aggression. Surprisingly, low self-control was associated with the genetic risk for DG only among women, and risk-taking/sensation-seeking did not explain genetic risk for DG in either sex. The results of this study have implications for the causes of comorbidity between DG and other psychiatric disorders, the search for genes associated with DG risk, and the possibility of sex differences in the etiology of DG. Using a broad-band inventory of personality supports the conclusion that there probably is a substantial proportion of genetic variation in DG that cannot be explained by individual differences in personality.
Using data from a large Australian twin sample we examined the extent to which genetic variation in the Big Three personality dimensions (positive emotionality, negative emotionality, and constraint) and their lower-order components explained genetic variation in the risk for disordered gambling (DG) among men and women. Genetic influences contributing to individual differences in normal-range personality traits explained over 40% of the genetic risk for DG, with a larger contribution among women than among men. The largest and most robust contributions came from the higher-order personality dimension of negative emotionality and its two lower-order dimensions of alienation and aggression. Surprisingly, low self-control was associated with the genetic risk for DG only among women, and risk-taking/sensation-seeking did not explain genetic risk for DG in either sex. The results of this study have implications for the causes of comorbidity between DG and other psychiatric disorders, the search for genes associated with DG risk, and the possibility of sex differences in the etiology of DG. Using a broad-band inventory of personality supports the conclusion that there probably is a substantial proportion of genetic variation in DG that cannot be explained by individual differences in personality.
2013 APA, all rights reserved
DATE PUBLISHED
2013 Feb
HISTORY
PUBSTATUS PUBSTATUSDATE
aheadofprint 2012/09/17
entrez 2012/09/19 06:00
pubmed 2012/09/19 06:00
medline 2013/11/19 06:00
AUTHORS
NAME COLLECTIVENAME LASTNAME FORENAME INITIALS AFFILIATION AFFILIATIONINFO
Slutske WS Slutske Wendy S WS Department of Psychology, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, USA. slutskew@missouri.edu
Cho SB Cho Seung Bin SB
Piasecki TM Piasecki Thomas M TM
Martin NG Martin Nicholas G NG
INVESTIGATORS
JOURNAL
VOLUME: 122
ISSUE: 1
TITLE: Journal of abnormal psychology
ISOABBREVIATION: J Abnorm Psychol
YEAR: 2013
MONTH: Feb
DAY:
MEDLINEDATE:
SEASON:
CITEDMEDIUM: Internet
ISSN:
ISSNTYPE:
MEDLINE JOURNAL
MEDLINETA: J Abnorm Psychol
COUNTRY: United States
ISSNLINKING: 0021-843X
NLMUNIQUEID: 0034461
PUBLICATION TYPE
PUBLICATIONTYPE TEXT
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Twin Study
COMMENTS AND CORRECTIONS
GRANTS
GRANTID AGENCY COUNTRY
MH66206 NIMH NIH HHS United States
GENERAL NOTE
KEYWORDS
MESH HEADINGS
DESCRIPTORNAME QUALIFIERNAME
Adult
Australia
Diseases in Twins psychology
Emotions psychology
Female psychology
Gambling psychology
Humans psychology
Impulsive Behavior psychology
Male psychology
Multivariate Analysis psychology
Personality genetics
Personality Inventory genetics
Risk Factors genetics
Risk-Taking genetics
Sex Factors genetics
SUPPLEMENTARY MESH
GENE SYMBOLS
CHEMICALS
OTHER ID's