Genetic Epidemiology, Translational Neurogenomics, Psychiatric Genetics and Statistical Genetics Laboratories investigate the pattern of disease in families, particularly identical and non-identical twins, to assess the relative importance of genes and environment in a variety of important health problems.
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PMID
22155943
TITLE
Genetic influences on life span and its relationship to personality: a 16-year follow-up study of a sample of aging twins.
ABSTRACT
OBJECTIVE NlmCategory: OBJECTIVE
The relationship between personality and life span is not well understood, and no study to date has examined genetic influences underlying this relationship. The present study aimed to explore the phenotypic and genetic relationship between personality and life span, as well as genetic influences on all-cause mortality.
METHODS NlmCategory: METHODS
Prospective community-based study including 3752 twin individuals older than 50 years. Neuroticism, psychoticism, extraversion, and social desirability and pessimism/optimism were measured at baseline using the Revised Eysenck Personality Questionnaire and the Revised Life Orientation Test, respectively. Information on age at death was obtained 16 years after the initial assessment of personality.
RESULTS NlmCategory: RESULTS
Extraversion was inversely related to mortality with the risk of death decreasing 3% per unit increase of the extraversion score. Psychoticism and pessimism were positively related to mortality with a 36% and 39% increase in risk of death per unit increase in the respective personality score. Heritability of life span was 7%. Cross-twin cross-trait hazard ratios (HRs) were only significant for optimism/pessimism in monozygotic (MZ) twins with no significant differences in HRs between MZ and dizygotic twins in all traits; however, there was a trend for slightly higher HRs in MZ compared with dizygotic twins in psychoticism and optimism/pessimism.
CONCLUSIONS NlmCategory: CONCLUSIONS
Extraversion, psychoticism, and optimism/pessimism are significant predictors of longevity; extraversion is associated with a reduction, and pessimism and psychoticism are associated with an increase in mortality risk. Genetic influences on longevity in Australian twins are very low (7%). Our data also suggest a small, albeit nonsignificant, genetic influence on the relationship of pessimism and psychoticism with life span.
DATE PUBLISHED
2012 Jan
HISTORY
PUBSTATUS PUBSTATUSDATE
aheadofprint 2011/12/07
entrez 2011/12/14 06:00
pubmed 2011/12/14 06:00
medline 2012/04/25 06:00
AUTHORS
NAME COLLECTIVENAME LASTNAME FORENAME INITIALS AFFILIATION AFFILIATIONINFO
Mosing MA Mosing Miriam A MA GeneticEpidemiology Unit, Queensland Institute of Medical Research, 300 Herston Rd, Herston, Brisbane, Queensland 4006, Australia. miriam.mosing@qimr.edu.au
Medland SE Medland Sarah E SE
McRae A McRae Allan A
Landers JG Landers Joseph George JG
Wright MJ Wright Margaret J MJ
Martin NG Martin Nicholas G NG
INVESTIGATORS
JOURNAL
VOLUME: 74
ISSUE: 1
TITLE: Psychosomatic medicine
ISOABBREVIATION: Psychosom Med
YEAR: 2012
MONTH: Jan
DAY:
MEDLINEDATE:
SEASON:
CITEDMEDIUM: Internet
ISSN:
ISSNTYPE:
MEDLINE JOURNAL
MEDLINETA: Psychosom Med
COUNTRY: United States
ISSNLINKING: 0033-3174
NLMUNIQUEID: 0376505
PUBLICATION TYPE
PUBLICATIONTYPE TEXT
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study
COMMENTS AND CORRECTIONS
GRANTS
GENERAL NOTE
KEYWORDS
MESH HEADINGS
DESCRIPTORNAME QUALIFIERNAME
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Australia epidemiology
Female epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies epidemiology
Gene-Environment Interaction epidemiology
Health Behavior epidemiology
Humans epidemiology
Life Expectancy epidemiology
Longevity genetics
Male genetics
Middle Aged genetics
Models, Genetic genetics
Personality genetics
Personality Assessment genetics
Social Class genetics
Survival Analysis genetics
Twins genetics
SUPPLEMENTARY MESH
GENE SYMBOLS
CHEMICALS
OTHER ID's