Genetic Epidemiology, Translational Neurogenomics, Psychiatric Genetics and Statistical Genetics Laboratories investigate the pattern of disease in families, particularly identical and non-identical twins, to assess the relative importance of genes and environment in a variety of important health problems.
QIMR Home Page
GenEpi Home Page
Publications
Contacts
Research
Staff Index
Collaborators
Software Tools
Computing Resources
Studies
Search
GenEpi Intranet
PMID
10473319
TITLE
The structure of genetic and environmental risk factors for three measures of disordered eating.
ABSTRACT
BACKGROUND NlmCategory: BACKGROUND
The study explored the genetic and environmental risk factors for both the behaviours and attitudes characteristic of disordered eating.
METHODS NlmCategory: METHODS
In three waves of data collection, information was collected from female twins regarding their eating and attitudes towards eating, weight and shape. The first assessment consisted of a self-report questionnaire (1988-9) with 1682 women. The second assessment consisted of a semi-structured psychiatric interview schedule (1992-3), completed by 1852 women, many of whom had completed Wave 1 assessment. The third assessment, with 325 women chosen from Waves 1 and 2 (1995-6), consisted of a semi-structured interview (the Eating Disorder Examination).
RESULTS NlmCategory: RESULTS
As only one twin pair was concordant for lifetime bulimia nervosa at Wave 3 assessment, ordinal measures of all assessments were used in a multivariate genetic analysis. Results indicated that additive genetic and non-shared environmental influences best explained variance in liability to disordered eating, with about 60% (95% CI 50-68) of the variance explained by genetic factors. Comparison with a model allowing for the effects of shared environment indicated genetic factors accounted for a similar degree of variance (59%, 95% CI 36-68).
CONCLUSION NlmCategory: CONCLUSIONS
Liability to the development of the behaviours and attitudes characteristic of eating disorders is best explained by both environmental and genetic factors, with covariation between the three measures best explained by a single latent phenotype of disordered eating which has a heritability of 60%.
DATE PUBLISHED
1999 Jul
HISTORY
PUBSTATUS PUBSTATUSDATE
pubmed 1999/09/03
medline 1999/09/03 00:01
entrez 1999/09/03 00:00
AUTHORS
NAME COLLECTIVENAME LASTNAME FORENAME INITIALS AFFILIATION AFFILIATIONINFO
Wade T Wade T T Department of Psychology, Flinders University of South Australia, Australia.
Martin NG Martin N G NG
Neale MC Neale M C MC
Tiggemann M Tiggemann M M
Treloar SA Treloar S A SA
Bucholz KK Bucholz K K KK
Madden PA Madden P A PA
Heath AC Heath A C AC
INVESTIGATORS
JOURNAL
VOLUME: 29
ISSUE: 4
TITLE: Psychological medicine
ISOABBREVIATION: Psychol Med
YEAR: 1999
MONTH: Jul
DAY:
MEDLINEDATE:
SEASON:
CITEDMEDIUM: Print
ISSN: 0033-2917
ISSNTYPE: Print
MEDLINE JOURNAL
MEDLINETA: Psychol Med
COUNTRY: England
ISSNLINKING: 0033-2917
NLMUNIQUEID: 1254142
PUBLICATION TYPE
PUBLICATIONTYPE TEXT
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
COMMENTS AND CORRECTIONS
REFTYPE REFSOURCE REFPMID NOTE
CommentIn Psychol Med. 2000 Mar;30(2):483-4 10824669
GRANTS
GRANTID AGENCY COUNTRY
AA 07535 NIAAA NIH HHS United States
AA 07728 NIAAA NIH HHS United States
GENERAL NOTE
KEYWORDS
MESH HEADINGS
DESCRIPTORNAME QUALIFIERNAME
Adult
Body Image
Body Weight
Bulimia psychology
Diseases in Twins genetics
Eating Disorders psychology
Female psychology
Genetic Predisposition to Disease genetics
Humans genetics
Personality Assessment genetics
Risk Factors genetics
Social Environment genetics
SUPPLEMENTARY MESH
GENE SYMBOLS
CHEMICALS
OTHER ID's